Simple Bounty

Finding Beauty, Grace and Sanity in a Busy World

The Shoe Throwing Incident December 18, 2008

Filed under: Current Events,Politics — katieosborne @ 2:07 pm

I promise I won’t keep talking politics – I want to get back to Christmas – but I have been so irritated by what I have heard from the media regarding this incident. People are either simply laughing about it (and I do admit, Bush does look rather comical as he’s ducking those forcefully hurled shoes) or they’re using it as an excuse to say, yet again, “look how we’ve succeeded in Iraq.” Funny, how they can spin almost anything taking place in that country into proof that we are “winning.”

Apparently, because this journalist wasn’t immediately beaten and dragged away to his execution (though he is in the hospital having suffered a broken arm and a head injury from being hit with the butt of a gun, and he faces up to 15 years in prison), it is proof of a flourishing democracy in Iraq. Even if this is true, which I do not believe it is, does that justify the uncountable number of innocent dead, the complete destruction of their infrastructure, their neighborhoods, their families, and the fact that we arrogantly waltzed into a country that posed no serious threat to us and became agents of terror and destruction? Hey, maybe, just maybe, this guy has a right to be angry. Maybe he lost a wife, a child, a brother at our hands. Or maybe he’s just enraged about what has become of his country in the name of “spreading democracy.” Whatever the case, his act is a symbol of resistance, a statement against our foreign policy, and a sentiment that many in the Middle East, and elsewhere, would like to express themselves, had they the courage and the opportunity.

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3 Responses to “The Shoe Throwing Incident”

  1. alarob Says:

    Brief and straight to the point. Thanks.

    Patrick Cockburn’s pre-shoe article on the under-reported Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) is an eye opener. He titles it “America Concedes.” The U.S. tried to arrange the kind of fake independence that Britain imposed on Iraq in the ’20s and ’30s. The Iraqis wouldn’t take it, and wore us down over nine months of negotiations. http://www.lrb.co.uk/v30/n24/cock01_.html

    Of course there are already news reports suggesting that U.S. brass in Iraq won’t keep our side of the bargain.

  2. Erin Says:

    So are you saying you see him as a hero? I would agree that things are messed up there and he has a right to be frustrated, but I on the other hand have seen him glorified and effigies of Bush with shoes hitting his face are offensive. Frustration and outrage–totally appropriate and acceptable. Improper display of that–wrong for anyone no matter what their side.

  3. katieosborne Says:

    I started writing a paragraph questioning whether it was a morally appropriate act, but I couldn’t get my thoughts out straight, and felt it didn’t flow with what I already said.

    I guess I have complex feelings about the issue. I don’t think it is right for someone to throw their shoes at anybody, yet I can sympathize with him, and it is a small offense compared to what this administration has done to him and his people, in my opinion.

    Perhaps he feels that this was one way he could actually be heard, knowing the media would be all over it. Let’s face it, the Iraqis really are not being heard in our country. There are many who have the same rage over what has become of them and their country, yet our government and its media tries its hardest to paint the picture that they see us as heros and liberators. While there may be some who do, I venture to guess they are a very small minority.


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